Bosses of Farnborough International Air Show have pledged to work with aviation chiefs reviewing safety measures at flying displays.

The Air Accident Investigation Branch (AAIB) released its final report on the Shoreham Airshow tragedy on Friday (March 3).

The report recommended that the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and Department for Transport carry out a national review of all air displays.

The disaster in West Sussex in August 2015 occurred when an ex-military Hawker Hunter jet lost control during a display and smashed into the A27. In total, 11 people were killed and 13 others injured.

A spokesman for Farnborough International said it was still reviewing the contents of the AAIB report but was ready to work with the authorities.

Safety governs every aspect of the Farnborough International Air Show, ensuring the protection of all parties whether they are inside or outside the show,” she said.

“In the lead-up to the 2016 air show, we increased our safety measures above the updated CAA regulations and also undertook thorough risk assessments with them.

“Going forward, we will continue to be the global exemplar and leader in air show safety and implement any further recommendations in light of lessons learned from this investigation.”

The AAIB report concluded that a catalogue of errors contributed to the Shoreham tragedy, chief among them the fact the antique jet had been issued a permit to fly despite improper maintenance and was not airworthy on the day of the crash.

Investigators also found there had been confusion between regulators, organisers and pilots at the Shoreham Airshow as to which of them was responsible for carrying out various risk assessments and taking necessary precautions.

Investigators found that an ex-military Hawker Hunter jet that crashed at the Shoreham Airshow in 2015, killing 11 people, was not airworthy
Investigators found that an ex-military Hawker Hunter jet that crashed at the Shoreham Airshow in 2015, killing 11 people, was not airworthy

Other recommendations contained in the report advised the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) to:

* Require operators of aircraft used for flying displays to identify and remove any hazardous materials;

* Review arrangements for safety regulation and oversight of ex-military aircraft to ensure they are “consistent and appropriate”;

* Undertake a study of “error paths” that lead to flying display accidents and use its findings to train air display organisers;

A UK-wide review of flying display safety, to prevent another crash like that at the Shoreham Airshow in 2015, will cover Farnborough Airshow
A UK-wide review of flying display safety, to prevent another crash like that at the Shoreham Airshow in 2015, will cover Farnborough Airshow

* Require pilots to fly alone while being evaluated for permission to perform displays at air shows

* Remind air show organisers of the need to keep detailed training records for pilots and check their compliance during inspections;

* Review the grouping of different aircraft types in air show displays to account for “significant handling and performance differences”;

* Require display pilots to be trained in performing escape manoeuvres and assess them on their abilities.